Responding to the Savior’s Invitation: “Come” | Neil J. Anderson | 2007

When we respond to the Savior's invitation to "come," we can feel the cleansing power of Christ's Atonement in our lives.

This speech was given May 8, 2007.

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https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/neil-j-anderson/responding-saviors-invitation-come/

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"Thank you, President Samuelson, for that kind introduction. And thank you, Brother Kooyman, for your prayer. Brother Kooyman and I first met in Athens, Ohio. We served together in a branch presidency there. Our families enjoyed many wonderful experiences together. We were fortunate enough to both receive offers to come to BYU in 1997. Each week Brother Kooyman and I come to the devotionals together. Attending the devotionals each week has provided the perfect opportunity for us to maintain our friendship and to be spiritually edified together. Brother Kooyman, I hope we enjoy this week’s talk as much as the previous 250 devotionals we have attended together.

Also, sisters, thank you very much for the music this morning. I love uplifting music and the positive effect it can have on our spirits. Good music helps us respond to the Savior’s invitation to come. That is the focus of my remarks today.

Before I move directly into my remarks, may I extend to you an invitation? Focus on the promptings from the Holy Ghost during our time together this morning. Listen for at least one idea that you will apply in your life within the next week. I invite you to do the same thing as you come to the devotionals each Tuesday. If we leave the devotionals each week with a determination to do something with what we have learned and felt, then we will truly be edified together as a campus community.

In the Old and New Testaments (Exodus 24:1; Isaiah 55:3; Matthew 4:19, 11:28–30; Mark 1:17; John 6:35; John 14:6; Revelation 22:17); in the Book of Mormon (1 Nephi 6:4; 2 Nephi 9:41, 45, 51; 2 Nephi 26:33; 2 Nephi 28:32; Jacob 1:7; Omni 1:25–26; Alma 29:2; 3 Nephi 12:3, 20, 23–24; 3 Nephi 18:28–33; 3 Nephi 21:20, 27; Mormon 9:27; Ether 5:5; Moroni 10:30, 32); in the Doctrine and Covenants (D&C 10:67; 18:11; 20:59; 45:5, 46; 132:12); and in modern-day hymns (“Come, Follow Me”; “Come unto Jesus”; “Come unto Him”) there are clear invitations from Heavenly Father, from Jesus Christ, and from prophets and apostles to come unto the Savior.

My goal today is to direct our attention to the invitation to Come unto Christ through the Ordinances and covenants of the gospel, Ministering to others with a humble attitude of self-Evaluation. I want to use the word come to organize my comments today. Each of the four letters in the word can serve as a reminder of four important points I would like to make.

Come unto Christ
First, the letter C reminds us to come.

Come is a verb of movement. The use of the word in the context we are examining is as an imperative or command. We could consider that this invitation is not merely a suggestion but rather a commandment that we move from where we are to where Heavenly Father and His Son Jesus Christ would like us to be. We are the ones who must make the effort to move.

Of the many invitations in the scriptures to come unto Christ, I would like to draw attention to two. Think about the need for movement as we read these verses. First, in Matthew we read an invitation from the Savior Himself:

Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.

For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. [Matthew 11:28–30]

Something that I notice when I read the invitations to come unto Christ is that there is usually the invitation followed by a promise. Read these verses again and notice the invitations followed by the promises. To help us visually, I have noted the invitations with underlined text and the promises with bold text.

Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.

For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light."